Research

Research in the School of Dentistry: Faculty, clinic, and student involvement

Research notebookOur programs in basic sciences, clinical sciences, and social and behavioral sciences and public health help bring current research into our classrooms, clinics, and dental practices statewide. Six research clusters investigate everything from neuroscience to oral health disparities.

Oral Health Clinical Research Center (OHCRC)

The OHCRC supports research projects in oral surgery, dental materials, restorative procedures, facial pain, neuroscience, caries, periodontal diseases and oral medicine.

OHCRC

Minnesota Craniofacial Research Training (MinnCResT) Program

MinnCResT is a D.D.S./Ph.D. program training the next generation of independent investigators exploring questions in craniofacial, oral health and dental research.

MinnCResT

Research Support

Resources for School of Dentistry researchers, including funding opportunities, statistical support, and process explanations.

Research Support

Student Research & Training Opportunities

Research programs and support for students from undergraduate to D.D.S./Ph.D. including summer fellowships.

Student research

Well-Funded Research

In fiscal year 2012, we received almost $11 million in funding through corporate contracts, foundation funding, university awards and 12 NIH institutes, including the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research.

Research ethics at the University of Minnesota

Research EthicsWe are committed to protecting research participants, upholding ethicial standards, and improving our practice at every step of our work

Research News

Mike T. John, PhD, DDS, MPH

The University of Minnesota School of Dentistry is leading an effort to create a universal tool that can be used internationally to measure patients’ perceived oral health quality. The tool, which will eventually take the form of a patient questionnaire, will one day generate the data needed by providers and researchers to more precisely measure the impact of treatment choices on patient populations.

Bone Cancer Team

Severe pain is a common symptom of many types of bone cancers. As patients and providers seek new treatments for pain that do not involve opioids – which are known to have adverse side effects including addiction - scientists at the University of Minnesota are seeking new solutions.  

Herzberg visual

University of Minnesota researchers have discovered this previously unknown signaling pathway that regulates surface proteins on bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics.