Research

Research in the School of Dentistry: Faculty, clinic, and student involvement

Research notebookOur programs in basic sciences, clinical sciences, and social and behavioral sciences and public health help bring current research into our classrooms, clinics, and dental practices statewide. Six research clusters investigate everything from neuroscience to oral health disparities.

Clinical Trials

Both researchers and people looking to volunteer for a study should use StudyFinder to search opportunities.

StudyFinder

Minnesota Craniofacial Research Training (MinnCResT) Program

MinnCResT is a D.D.S./Ph.D. program training the next generation of independent investigators exploring questions in craniofacial, oral health and dental research.

MinnCResT

Research Support

Resources for School of Dentistry researchers, including funding opportunities, statistical support, and process explanations.

Research Support

Student Research & Training Opportunities

Research programs and support for students from undergraduate to D.D.S./Ph.D. including summer fellowships.

Student research

Well-Funded Research

In fiscal year 2012, we received almost $11 million in funding through corporate contracts, foundation funding, university awards and 12 NIH institutes, including the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research.

Research ethics at the University of Minnesota

Research EthicsWe are committed to protecting research participants, upholding ethicial standards, and improving our practice at every step of our work

Research News

Louis M. Mansky, PhD

University of Minnesota researchers in the Institute for Molecular Virology (IMV) have made a key discovery that could have important implications for developing a strategy to stop the spread of a highly infectious virus currently spreading among remote areas of central Australia. Called human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), infection rates are reportedly exceeding 40 percent among adults in those communitites. HTLV-1, the first human cancer virus discovered, can cause leukemia and lymphoma.

Louis M. Mansky, PhD

University of Minnesota researchers in the Institute for Molecular Virology (IMV) have made a key discovery that could have important implications for developing a strategy to stop the spread of a highly infectious virus currently spreading among remote areas of central Australia. Called human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), infection rates are reportedly exceeding 40 percent among adults in those communitites. HTLV-1, the first human cancer virus discovered, can cause leukemia and lymphoma.

Galina Yakovlev

Second year University of Minnesota School of Dentistry student Galina Yakovlev was awarded second place in the Student Competition for Advancing Dental Research and its Application (SCADA) for her poster titled "Investigating the effect of PEITC, a natural chemopreventive agent, on the tobacco carcinogen-induced DNA damage in oral cells." She accepted the award at the American Association for Dental Research annual meeting, held March 21-24 in Ft. Lauderdale , Fla.